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CBS Fires Producer of ‘Magnum P.I.’ After Workplace Complaints


CBS Television Studios confirmed that Mr. Lenkov had one more year on his deal with the company. It was unclear whether CBS would pay him for the remainder of his contract.

“Our studio is committed to ensuring safe and respectful production environments,” CBS Television Studios said in its statement. “Over the past year, we have assigned human resource production partners to every show, expanded staff training and increased reporting options.”

The company added, “Every complaint is taken seriously, every claim is investigated, and when evidence is clear that policies were violated and values not upheld, we take decisive action.”

The long-running “Hawaii Five-O” survived the departures of two of its stars, Daniel Dae Kim and Grace Park, both Asian-American. They left in 2017 after asking for payment equal to that of fellow leading cast members Alex O’Loughlin and Scott Caan. The network faced criticism from fans and the Media Action Network for Asian-Americans for failing to keep them aboard.

At the time, Mr. Lenkov said CBS “was extremely generous and proactive in their renegotiation talks,” adding, “So much so, the actors were getting unprecedented raises, but in the end they chose to move on.”

Under the former CBS chief executive Leslie Moonves, the network built a prime-time lineup that was heavy on programs, many of them police shows, led by white male stars. Since Mr. Moonves was ousted in September 2018 while facing multiple claims of sexual misconduct, CBS has made efforts to improve its workplace culture.

In 2018, the network fired Brad Kern, the “NCIS: New Orleans” showrunner, who had been accused of mistreating women and making racially insensitive comments. The network also paid the actress Eliza Dushku $9.5 million to settle her claim that she was sexually harassed on the set of the program “Bull” by the show’s star, Michael Weatherly. Mr. Weatherly apologized and the show has remained a CBS fixture.

Last year, after the network introduced new protocols for handling on-set issues, two female writers left the CBS sitcom “Carol’s Second Act” after making complaints about sexual harassment and the overall workplace environment.



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